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Martha Walker

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences; Professor of French

Martha Walker

AB, Duke University; MA, University of Virginia; PhD, Harvard University

Martha Walker is dean of the college of arts and sciences and professor of French and Women’s Studies. Dean since 2016 and previously director of the honors program and chair of the former school of arts & humanities, she also has a scholarly research focus on politics and gender in contemporary French and Francophone theater. While the students, faculty, and curriculum of the College of Arts & Sciences are keeping her from the classroom in 2017-2018, she hopes to return to teaching about gender and performance in the not too distant future. In the meantime, she is enjoying her role supporting the university’s liberal arts foundation and all that it can do to prepare our students for their future.

540-887-7053

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Sara Botkin

Instructor of Mathematics

Sara Botkin

I earned a B.S. in mathematics from Bridgewater College, my secondary education license from Mary Baldwin, and a M.Ed. in mathematics from James Madison University.  My master’s thesis was on the benefits of technology in the math classroom.  My academic interests include learning new technology and incorporating technology into my courses, creating rich math lessons that include real world applications, and mentoring students who are interested in teaching mathematics.  My leisure time is spent with my husband and two children camping, boating, and on our family farm.

540-887-7053

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Clayton Brooks

Assistant Professor of History

Clayton Brooks

BA, Roanoke College; MA, PhD, University of Virginia

Mary Baldwin Assistant Professor of History Clayton McClure Brooks recently published her second book The Uplift Generation: Cooperation across the Color Line in Early Twentieth-Century Virginia, offering new insight into the formative years of Jim Crow and how segregation was established in Virginia.

The author’s writing explores the concept that segregation was not formed in the state by white political power structures alone, but rather through cooperation from a generation of Virginia reformers across the color line from 1900 to 1930.

The journey to completion for The Uplift Generation started with Brooks’ dissertation at the University of Virginia and became a story that Brooks felt compelled to carry further. Read more >>

 

540-887-7107

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Paul A. Callo

Professor of Biology

Paul A. Callo

BS, MS, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; PhD, University of Maryland

I have always been an inquisitive person, and have disliked not knowing the answers to puzzling questions. To that end, I have always endeavored to learn as much as I can about a wide variety of subjects. As an undergraduate, I focused on the organismal aspects of biology. I received my BS in biology from Virginia Tech in 1993 and immediately entered graduate school (also at Virginia Tech) to study blue jay food caching. While there I was able to definitively demonstrate that blue jays, an important dispersal agent for large-nut trees like oaks, remember with great precision the location of their own caches and have great difficulty finding the caches of other jays. After receiving my master’s degree in biology in 1996, I spent a summer conducting songbird surveys in the backwoods of West Virginia. I then went on to pursue my PhD in zoology at the University of Maryland, College Park. While there I studied predator-prey relationships in migratory songbirds. I specifically focused on the spatial allocation of parental care by red-eyed vireos, blue-headed vireos & hooded warblers and how it is affected by their differing extra-pair mating strategies (contrary to popular belief most bird species are not faithful for life).

Since that time I have continued to work with red-eyed vireos and have been able to extend a basic study of behavior into a long-term study of their territory fidelity and survivorship at the Hemlock Hill Biological Research Area in Pennsylvania. In the past year I have expanded this study to include sites in Augusta County, Virginia. I have also begun to include an annual survey of blood parasites found among these birds in these areas.

I greatly enjoy teaching students about science and biology. I particularly delight in those “Aha!” moments when students recognize the interconnectedness of all the things they have been learning about. The environment afforded us here at Mary Baldwin University is key to that enjoyment. The hands-on learning format of our lab courses offers students the opportunity to not only hear about how biological processes work in lecture, but also see for themselves how they work.

In my spare time I enjoy playing with the kids, home renovation projects, hiking with the dogs, and music!

540-885-5588

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Ralph Cohen

Professor of Shakespeare and Performance and English; Virginia Worth Gonder Fellow in Theatre

Ralph Cohen

Ralph Alan Cohen is Co-Founder and Director of Mission at the American Shakespeare Center and Gonder Professor of Shakespeare and Performance and founder of the Master of Letters and Fine Arts program at Mary Baldwin University. He was project director for the building of the Blackfriars Playhouse — a recreation of Shakespeare’s indoor theatre — in Staunton Virginia. He has directed 30 productions of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including America’s first professional production of Francis Beaumont’s The Knight of the Burning Pestle. He also directed the first revival of Thomas Middleton’s Your Five Gallants and co-edited the play for Oxford University Press’s Collected Works of Thomas Middleton. He is the author of ShakesFear and How to Cure It: A Handbook for Teaching Shakespeare. He twice edited special teaching issues of the Shakespeare Quarterly and has published articles on teaching Shakespeare as well as on Shakespeare, Jonson, and Elizabethan staging. He founded the Studies Abroad program at James Madison University, where he won Virginia’s award for outstanding faculty. He has frequently directed summer institutes on Shakespeare and staging sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 2001 he established the Blackfriars Conference, a bi-annual week-long celebration of early modern drama in performance. In 2008, Cohen and ASC co-founder Jim Warren earned the Commonwealth Governor’s Arts Award. In 2009 he was the Theo Crosby Fellow at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. He earned his undergraduate degree at Dartmouth College and his doctorate at Duke University and has honorary degrees from St. Lawrence University and Georgetown University.

540-887-7273

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Mary Hill Cole

Professor of History

Mary Hill Cole

BA, James Madison University; MA, PhD, University of Virginia

Dr. Mary Hill Cole is professor of history and director of the Virginia Program at Oxford. She received her PhD in English history at the University of Virginia. She teaches undergraduate courses in English history, modern European history, and women’s history. In the graduate MLitt/MFA Shakespeare in Performance program, she teaches courses in Tudor-Stuart political, religious, and social history.  She is the recipient of three awards for teaching and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.  Her book, The Portable Queen: Elizabeth I and the Politics of Ceremony, was published by the University of Massachusetts Press.

Her other publications on Elizabeth progresses include:
Carole Levin, Jo Eldridge Carney and Debra Barrett-Graves, eds., “Elizabeth I: Always Her Own Free Woman” (Ashgate, 2003); Jayne Elisabeth Archer, Elizabeth Goldring, and Sarah Knight, eds., “The Progresses, Pageants, and Entertainments of Queen Elizabeth I” (Oxford University Press, 2007); and Josi Barbier, François Chausson, and Sylvain Destephen, eds., “The Travelling Government of Elizabeth I:  Enacting Queenship Through Progresses” (Fayard éditions, forthcoming 2018).  She also focuses on the family of Elizabeth I and has published chapters about them in Donald Stump, Linda Shenk, and Carole Levin, eds., “Maternal Memory: Elizabeth Tudor’s Anne Boleyn” (ACMRS, 2011); and Sarah Duncan and Valerie Schutte, eds., “The Half-Blood Princes:  Mary I, Elizabeth I, and their Strategies of Legitimation” (Palgrave, 2016).

540-887-7102

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Maria Craig

Associate Professor of Chemistry

Maria Craig

BS, James Madison University; PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dr. Craig is interested in studying a short protein molecule called LL37which has been implicated in the onset of certain autoimmune diseases. LL37 can bind to DNA and fold DNA into small packages, thus allowing DNA to enter cells by facilitating their movement across the cell membrane. A 2007 report by Lande et al.[1] in Nature suggests that LL37-mediated uptake of DNA by certain immune cells may incite an immune response to self-DNA, leading to the production of anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and psoriasis.

Although much is known about the structure and function of LL37, the details of the binding interaction between LL37 and DNA remain to be elucidated. How does LL37 fold DNA into small packages and allow DNA to cross the cell membrane? Does LL37 recognize specific DNA sequences? How many LL37 molecules bind to DNA at one time? Dr. Craig proposes to investigate these questions by performing specific biophysical chemistry studies that are well-suited to undergraduate research. For instance, a decrease in the strength of binding of LL37 to DNA as the salt concentration is increased indicates a lack of sequence-specificity.

887-7271

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Paul D. Deeble

Professor of Biology; Caroline Rose Hunt Chair in the Natural Sciences

Paul D. Deeble

Pennsylvania State University; PhD, University of Virginia

www.marybaldwin.edu/pauldeeble

Dr. Paul Deeble joined the biology department at Mary Baldwin University in 2002 as an assistant professor. Dr. Deeble earned his BS in biology/vertebrate physiology from Pennsylvania State University in 1996. While at Penn State, he worked as a co-op research scientist for Burroughs Wellcome and Glaxo Wellcome in Research Triangle Park, NC. Dr. Deeble worked in the Molecular Pharmacology Division and the focus of his studies was Alzheimer’s disease. He then earned a PhD in molecular medicine and microbiology in 2002 from the University of Virginia. The title of Dr. Deeble’s dissertation was Mechanisms of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Leading to Paracrine Growth Stimulation. Dr. Deeble presented his work at numerous regional, national, and international conferences including the Fifteenth Annual Meeting on Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors and a keystone symposium on advances in human breast and prostate cancer. He has published multiple peer-reviewed articles in research journals such as Cancer Research, Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Molecular and Cellular Biology. While completing his graduate work in the Cancer Center at UVA, Dr. Deeble was a finalist for the Michael J. Peach Outstanding Graduate Student Award, and he served as the Paul and Virginia Wright ARCS Scholar after receiving a fellowship from the ARCS Foundation. Dr. Deeble completed his postdoctoral training at the University of Virginia Cardiovascular Center, performing research focused on the abnormal vasculature that forms in many tumors. During this time, he was an adjunct assistant professor of biology at Piedmont Virginia Community College teaching lectures and labs in anatomy and physiology. Dr. Deeble has maintained professional memberships in the American Association of Cancer Research, the North Atlantic Vascular Biology Organization, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Since coming to Mary Baldwin University, he has taught classes in a variety of sub-disciplines in biology including anatomy, physiology, genetics, human health and medicine, and electron microscopy. Dr. Deeble maintains a research interest in the role of neuroendocrine (NE) cells in prostate cancer progression and recently was awarded a research grant through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to study apoptosis in NE cells in various stages of prostate cancer. Seniors within the biology department work with Dr. Deeble on this grant to complete their senior thesis research requirement. Dr. Paul Deeble was recently honored by Who’s Who Among America’s College and University Teachers for the 2005-2006 academic year. He also serves as a textbook reviewer for Thomson Delmar Learning, and has reviewed multiple textbooks and online modules in anatomy and physiology. In addition to Dr. Deeble’s love for teaching, he enjoys road and mountain biking, playing soccer, serving as a run leader for “Squirrels on the Run”, and participating in the American Cancer Society Relay for Life. Most of all Dr. Deeble enjoys spending time with his wife, Dr. Jennifer Visger, and daughter Zoe.

540-887-7114

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Amy Diduch

Professor of Economics

Amy Diduch

BA, College of William and Mary; MA, PhD, Harvard University

Amy McCormick Diduch earned her MA and PhD in economics from Harvard University and her BA in economics from the College of William and Mary. Her research interests are in the fields of labor economics and public finance. She recently published an article entitled “Global Strike Patterns, Macroeconomic Variations and Industrial Relations” in the International Review of Comparative Public Policy. Dr. Diduch is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Omicron Delta Kappa.

540-887-7173

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Kristen "Krissy" Egan

Associate Professor of English

Kristen "Krissy" Egan

BS, Le Moyne College; MA, State University of New York at Courtland; PhD, Loyola University

It was the tedious prospect of counting microscopic asbestos fibers that led Kristen Egan, then a recent biology grad, to change course and return to school for her PhD in English. Fortunately, Egan was able to put her scientific background to use for her doctoral dissertation, in which she analyzed texts to examine the relationship between race and nature in 19th century America.

Kristen Egan, assistant professor of English, teaches courses in American Literature, African-American Literature, Literature and the Environment, and writing.  She previously taught at Le Moyne College and Loyola University Chicago.  She has an interdisciplinary background, earning her doctorate in English from Loyola University Chicago, her M.A. in English from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Cortland, and a B.S. in Biology from Le Moyne College.  She specializes in nineteenth century American literature, focusing on nature, race, and identity.  Her dissertation, Infectious Agents: Race and Environment in Nineteenth-Century America, examines the mutual constructions of space and race in America across the long nineteenth century. She has an article forthcoming in Women’s Studies Quarterly entitled “Conservation and Cleanliness: Racial and Environmental Purity in Ellen Richards and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.”

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Mary Jane Epps

Assistant Professor of Biology

Mary Jane Epps

BA, Duke University; PhD, University of Arizona

Originally from Albemarle County, Mary Jane Epps returned to Virginia to write her dissertation after earning an undergraduate degree at Duke University and a PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona. The subject: interactions between fungus-feeding insects and mushroom assemblages. The setting: Mountain Lake Biological Station in Giles County. “I find interactions among species to be endlessly exciting, especially those that involve plants, insects, and fungi,” Epps says. “My current projects include studying how fungal-insect interactions are shaped by climate change, and exploring how ants can affect forest fungi to shape forest decomposition and nutrient exchange. I also study the unusual pollination ecology of azaleas.” Epps loves music, and plays traditional Appalachian fiddle and banjo. She also enjoys spinning and dyeing wool with wild plants, gardening, and raising heritage livestock. “I’m most excited about getting students involved with research, and taking students out into the field to explore some of our local wild places and learn about biology first hand.”

540-887-7078

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Katharine Franzen

Assistant Professor of History

Katharine Franzen

MA, St. Andrews University; PhD, University of Virginia

Dr. Franzen is a part-time assistant professor of history, teaching European history courses on campus and in the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs. She also teaches Inquiry in the Social Sciences in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program at Mary Baldwin University. Her special interest is in modern British history, and her dissertation was on government assisted emigration from rural England during the nineteenth century. Dr. Franzen first came to the United States as the St. Andrews Exchange Scholar to the College of William and Mary. Her most recent interest is in oral history, particularly of World War II veterans and civilians. She has edited a series of memoirs by a U.S. combat veteran of World War II.

Dr. Franzen is passionate about classroom teaching and about opening her students’ eyes to the difference between knowing what happened and understanding why. She also seeks to find parallels in history, both recent and in the more distant past, which help us to recognize events and outcomes, with similarities and differences. Where possible and relevant, she tries to make history immediate to our everyday lives and decisions, and enjoys bringing outside speakers into the classroom.

540-887-7326

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Louise M. Freeman

Professor of Psychology

Louise M. Freeman

BS, Emory University; MA, PhD, University of California at Berkeley

Louise Freeman attended Emory University where she received her Bachelor of Science in biology. She then attended the University of California at Berkeley where she earned her masters in biological psychology, followed by her PhD a few years later. Dr. Freeman also conducted three years of post-doctoral research at the University of Virginia.

Her major of interest is behavioral neuroendocrinology, the effects of hormones on behavior. Specifically, she is interested in the role of hormones in sex differences in both human and animal models. More recently, she has developed a new research program about psychology and young adult literature. She has published several papers on psychological themes in popular series such as Harry Potter, Hunger Games and Divergent. She also as an on-going collaboration with a sixth grade English teacher to measure the effects of reading on empathy in students. Dr. Freeman speaks regularly at Harry Potter festivals and is a contributing faculty member at the Hogwarts Professor blog (www.hogwartsprofessor.com)

“My own research has shown that reading in 6th graders is associated with increased empathy, and that Harry Potter reading in general is associated both with reduced stigmatization IOC people with mental illness and increased tendency to take others’ perspective. This is in line with other researchers that found reduced prejudice against other groups (immigrants, refugees) in Harry Potter readers,” said Dr. Freeman.

A third interest of hers is Applied Behavior Analysis. She currently works as a behavior support clinician at Compass Counseling Services and is seeking Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) credentials.

Here at Mary Baldwin, Dr. Freeman teaches Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science, Behavioral Statistics, Drugs and Behavior, Physiological Psychology, Sensation and Perception, and Forensic Psychology. She also team-teaches a honors class in Human Morality with Dr. Rod Owen. She lives in Crozet, VA with her husband, Brian, their two children, Amanda and Noah, and a beagle named Lenny. In her spare time, she enjoys cooking, reading and travel.

540-887-7302

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Nadine Gergel-Hackett

Associate Professor of Physics; Director of the Global Honor Scholars Program

Nadine Gergel-Hackett

BS, PhD, University of Virginia

Dr Gergel-Hackett’s research is focused on the design, fabrication, and physics of novel materials and devices with advantages in scaling and energy for future low-power high-performance electronics. One example of a research project that she is working on includes studying and modeling a novel nanoelectronic device known as the memristor.   This new device exhibits electrical characteristics with exciting new applications and is an excellent technology to be studied by undergraduate students.

Patent

Nonvolatile Memory Device and Processing Method,Nadine Gergel-Hackett, Behrang Hamadani, Curt Richter, David Gundlach, # US 20090184397 A1.  Filed 12/22/2008 and granted 06/02/2015.

Publications and H-Index

Total citations of N. Gergel-Hackett’s publications and h-index available at: http://www.scopus.com/authid/detail.url?origin=AuthorProfile&authorId=18037158700

540-887-7118

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Jenna Holt

Associate Professor of Psychology

Jenna Holt

BS, James Madison University; MS, Radford University; PsyD, James Madison University

Jenna Holt makes no secret about her wish to see more students choose psychology as a major. In fact, one of her favorite courses to teach is Intro to Psychology, because, she jokes, “it’s a great challenge to get students to see how exciting psychology can be and try to win them over to the ‘dark side’ so they take psych as a major.”

Dr. Holt received her Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences at James Madison University. She then went on to obtain her Masters in Counseling from Radford University and her Doctorate degree in Clinical and School Psychology from James Madison University. Dr. Holt is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and maintains her clinical skills by performing psychological assessments and outpatient counseling to clients in the area. At Mary Baldwin, Dr. Holt is the clinical psychologist within the psychology department, teaching introductory psychology classes as well as classes such as Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy, Abnormal Psychology, and Applied Behavior Analysis. She will also be designing and teaching a new course on Ecopsychology, which is the study of people and their connection/relationship with the natural world. This is Dr. Holt’s personal area of interest outside of her clinical studies, and is also the topic on which she based her dissertation.

Dr. Holt grew up in New York State and Virginia, and she currently lives in Fishersville with her husband and three cats. She enjoys spending time with family and friends, enjoying the outdoors, swimming, baking, and reading.

540-887-7286

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Joseph Johnson

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Joseph Johnson

BA, Western Michigan University; MA and PhD, University of Virginia

I hold a master’s degree and PhD in mathematics from University of Virginia. My area is algebraic topology, the study of general geometric shapes. Specifically, I am interested in both equivariant K-theory and homotopy type theory. K-theory gives us a way to add, subtract, and multiply geometric shapes. By studying this, one gets a lot of information about properties of the shape. K-theory shows up in physics quite often, especially in grand unified theories, ideas first championed by Einstein. Homotopy type theory is a way to examine logic, the basis of all mathematics, using topology and algebra. In graduate school, I taught in both the ITE and BRIDGE summer programs in the engineering department at University of Virginia. In my free time I am an avid cyclist and vacationer.

540-887-7193

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Sarah Kennedy

Professor of English

Sarah Kennedy

BA, MA, Butler University; PhD, Purdue University

http://sarahkennedybooks.com

Sarah Kennedy, Mary Baldwin professor of English, holds an MFA from Vermont College and a PhD from Purdue University. She is the author of seven books of poetry, most recently The Gold Thread, and the historical novels The Altarpiece, City of Ladies, and The King’s Sisters, books one, two, and three of the Cross and the Crown series. Sarah Kennedy has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Virginia Commission for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She is a contributing editor for Shenandoah and West Branch and serves as the faculty advisor for Mary Baldwin’s online literary and arts journal Outrageous Fortune.

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Katherine "Katie" Low

Associate Professor of Religion; College Chaplain

Katherine "Katie" Low

BA, Doane College; MDiv and PhD, Texas Christian University

Dr. Katherine (Katie) Low grew up in a tiny rural town in Nebraska where she attended First Congregational Church, United Church of Christ. She studied at Doane College, a UCC affiliated liberal arts college, where she triple majored in Religious Studies, Spanish, and English. In partial fulfillment for the Bachelor of Arts, Dr. Low studied abroad twice, first, in Israel and the West Bank at Tantur Ecumenical Institute, then at Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra in Santiago, Dominican Republic. After college, she became a UCC and Disciples of Christ Homeland Ministries Intern and was sent to San Antonio, Texas, to become Volunteer Summer Coordinator at Inman Christian Center. There, she worked with many ministers who consistently told her she should go to seminary, so she heeded their advice and went back to Texas for her education.

Dr. Low received an MDiv and PhD from Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth, Texas. She was ordained as a UCC minister in 2004, working as Associate Campus Minister at the Wesley Foundation, TCU.Dr. Low’s course work expanded across many disciplines, reaching into art history, film studies, and multidisciplinary women’s studies. Dr. Low’s interests in Christian history, cultural and gender studies, and biblical studies led to the completion of her dissertation titled “Domestic Disputations at the Dung Heap: A Reception History of Job and His Wife in Christianity of the West.” She continues to explore intersections of religion, gender, and culture, as evident in published articles in Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Biblical InterpretationJournal of Religion and Film, and Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion.

Dr. Low enjoys teaching introductory courses on the Bible and introducing students to the complexities of her field. She also enjoys reading vampire novels and watching films, especially zombie related ones. Besides her spouse, Dr. Low’s family consists of one daughter who lights up her life, and two dogs who often challenge her patience.

540-887-7142

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Heather E. Macalister

Associate Professor of Psychology; Director of Women's Studies

Heather E. Macalister

AB, Smith College; MEd, State University of West Georgia; PhD, University of Georgia

Heather Macalister is a Life-Span Developmental Psychologist with interest in women’s psychosocial development in adolescence, young adulthood, and midlife. At Mary Baldwin she is Chair of the Psychology department, and teaches the developmental psychology sequence (Child Psych, Adolescent Psych, and Adulthood) as well as Psychology of Women and Introductory Psychology. She is a firm believer in women’s education and received her own Bachelor’s degree from Smith. Her Ph.D. is in Life-Span Developmental Psychology with a co-major in Women’s Studies. She also holds a Master’s degree in Career Counseling and initially pursued her Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. In addition to completing postdoctoral fellowships in teaching writing at Cornell and Duke, she has been teaching college psychology for 15 years, being part of Mary Baldwin’s Psychology Department since 2003.

Dr. Macalister grew up outside New York City and has lived in MA; NY state; Atlanta; Durham, NC and currently VA with her husband, also an academic psychologist, and their 7-year-old son, a 4-year-old daughter, and Jack Russell terrier, Georgia. She enjoys a variety of child-centered activities that she shares with her family: cooking, crafts, horseback riding, skiing, hiking, bike-riding, travel, “movie night,” and snuggling up with a good book.

540-887-7096

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Chandra Mason

Associate Professor of Psychology

Chandra Mason

BA, University of Virginia; MA, James Madison University; PhD, The City University of New York

Chandra Mason is a social-personality psychologist with broad research interests in social justice, social roles, and social neuroscience.  She first began teaching at Mary Baldwin in 2002 in the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs, and returned full-time to the main campus in 2008, where she regularly teaches the Introductory Psychology course series, Experimental Psychology, Social Psychology, Personality Psychology, the Psychology of Social Justice, and History and Systems of Psychology, and occasionally teaches Behavioral Statistics and Industrial/Organizational Psychology.  Professor Mason earned degrees in Psychology from the University of Virginia, James Madison University, and The Graduate School and University Center at the City University of New York, and enjoys spending time with her family, reading, traveling, patronizing the performing arts, and watching (mostly) good television and films.

540-887-7238

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Anne McGovern

Associate Professor of French

Anne McGovern

BA, MA, State University of New York at Stony Brook; PhD, Vanderbilt University

Anne McGovern is associate professor of French. Her research interests include French colonial and Francophone post-colonial literature, and more specifically the use of the French language between colonizer and colonized. Courses include beginning and intermediate French, upper-level literature courses in English, French Food Culture, and French Revolution (co-taught with Mary Hill Cole.)

540-887-7115

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Amy Sims Miller

Assitant Professor of Asian Studies; International Student Advisor

Amy Sims Miller

BA, Wesleyan University; MA, PhD, University of Virginia

804-282-9162

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Kerry Mills

Assistant Professor of Art History; ADP Advisor

Kerry Mills

BS, BFA, MA, Virginia Commonwealth University

Kerry Mills is an Assistant Professor of Art History and a Faculty Adviser in “New Name for Baldwin Online and Adult Programs” in Richmond. Kerry received her Masters of Arts in Art History from Virginia Commonwealth University with a focus in American Art and Modernism. Her Masters Thesis is titled “Reconsidering Barnett Newman.” While writing her thesis, Kerry was awarded a Fellowship from the National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian. Her research includes interviews with Clement Greenberg, Irving Sandler, Jules Olitski, Richard Carylon, Annalee Newman and Helen Frankenthaler. She has presented at The South Eastern College Art Conference three times, was a Graduate Lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, co-curated numerous shows in Richmond and New York, as well as working with galleries in Richmond on exhibitions and projects. She has published numerous critical essays in art publications including New Art Examiner and Art Papers. Currently, she is working with the archives of Davi Det Hompson’s estate and Virginia Commonwealth University to create a monograph on the artist, and writing an article on his relationship with Fluxus Mail Art practices.

804-282-9150

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Patricia "Pat" Murphy

Associate Professor of Psychology

Patricia "Pat" Murphy

BS, George Washington University; MA, University of Vermont; PhD, University of Vermont, Burlington

540-887-7061

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Marina Omar

Assistant Professor of Political Science

Marina Omar

BA, MA and PhD, University of Virginia

540-887-7282

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John Ong

Associate Professor of Mathematics

John Ong

BE, University of Malaya; MS, MA, University of Kansas; MS, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; PhD, University of Virginia

I hold a master’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas, a master’s degree in mathematics from Virginia Tech, and a PhD in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia. I am technically trained in the area of Functional Analytic Methods in Partial Differential Equations. My interests include mentoring and supporting women who are interested in graduate school in mathematics or who are going to graduate school in a discipline where mathematics is an indispensable tool. Other important facets in my life are family, friends, Tai Chi, travel, and the advancement of LGBTQ issues. Personal motto: “This is the day which the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.”

540-887-7309

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Roderic L. Owen

Professor of Philosophy

Roderic L. Owen

BA, College of Wooster; MA, Kent State University; EdD, College of William and Mary

Dr. Roderic Owen has been a faculty member at Mary Baldwin University for over 25 years teaching introductory philosophy courses, applied and advanced ethics seminars, and a survey of the world’s religions to a diverse range of students: women in the residential program, graduate MAT students, PEGs, and returning adult students. His doctorate is from the College of William and Mary, Virginia, and his dissertation was focused on Models for Teaching Ethics at the Undergraduate Level.Over the past several years, Dr. Owen has developed and taught a seminar primarily focused on ethics and education to graduate students and an honors colloquium on Science, Religion, and the Search for Meaning; helped implement community service courses and internships; and created a multi-disciplinary minor focused on Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution. He has team-taught a number of different types of courses including freshman colloquia, the senior seminar in philosophy and religion, a graduate-level seminar on philosophy and education, as well as a number of interdisciplinary honors colloquia.

Dr. Owen’s areas of philosophical research and professional interest include character education; interdisciplinary approaches to the teaching of ethics; and the interfaith dialogue. His most recent sabbatical was spent at a woman’s college in Madurai, India where he led faculty seminar on interfaith issues and gave talks at the local Gandhi Centre. He is a member of the APA, the regional Philosophy of Education Society, the Association for Moral Education, the Virginia Humanities Association, the Association for Ethics across the Curriculum, and the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics.

In personal terms, Dr. Owen is a native of Wales and is married to Linda, a fourth grade teacher and school counselor, and they are parents to three sons — two of whom are college students. He is currently a member of the City of Staunton School Board, has served as an elder and teacher in the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., and recently completed a term as President of the North American Association for the Study of Welsh Culture and History. Ph: 540-887-7309 Fax: 540-887-7137

540-887-7069

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Brenci Patiño

Associate Professor of Spanish

Brenci Patiño

BA, University of Texas; MA and PhD, University of Illinois

Brenci Patiño is associate professor of Spanish and U.S. Latina/o Studies. She completed her BA at the University of Texas at Brownsville, and her MA and PhD at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include cultural and literary representations of working-class women, U.S. Latina/o literature and cultural production, and contemporary Mexican narrative fiction. Her work is, more specifically, concerned with looking at ways in which working-class women and their upper-class counterparts negotiate power.

Dr. Patiño has taught Spanish language courses and Latin American literature and culture at the University of Illinois, Texas Lutheran University, San Antonio College, and the University of Texas at San Antonio. At Mary Baldwin University, she teaches intermediate- and advanced-level Spanish, U.S. Latina/o literature and culture, 20th century Latin American literature, and Latin American and Spanish culture. Additionally, she has an active role in the Latino Culture Gateway.

A native of Brownsville, Texas, Professor Patiño grew up in the bicultural environment of the Mexico-U.S. border. She loves both norteño and Tejano music, traditional Latin American music, son jarocho, Spanish hip-hop, nueva trova, and Latin pop. She enjoys traveling, and spending time with her nieces and nephews in South Texas and northern Mexico.

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Brian "Rick" Plant

Professor of English; Department Head

Brian "Rick" Plant

BA, Oklahoma State University; AM, MFA, Washington University

Rick Plant, professor of English and current Head of the English Department, holds degrees from Oklahoma State University and Washington University, St. Louis. Prof. Plant’s research interests are in short fiction, modern American fiction, autobiography, and creative writing. He has published short fiction, personal essays, poems, and reviews in a variety of national magazines and anthologies. His national writing awards include an O. Henry Prize for short fiction, a “Novella Breakthrough” award (with publication by Texas Review Press), and a “Notable Essay” designation in the Best American Essays anthology. His manuscript story collection The Misery of Music was a finalist for both the Flannery O’Connor Award (University of Georgia Press) and the Spokane Prize in Fiction (Eastern Washington University Press).

540-887-7010

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Robert "Bob" Robinson

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Robert "Bob" Robinson

AS, Piedmont Virginia Community College; BS, Longwood College; MS, North Carolina State University

Hi, I’m Bob. I’m an adjunct assistant sociology professor and academic advisor for the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs at Mary Baldwin University. Thanks for taking the time to read about my areas of interest in sociology and life in general.

Sociology’s emphasis on the examination of social forces fascinates me. I became interested in the field when I took my first sociology class in the late 1980’s, when I was attending Piedmont Virginia Community College in order to earn a business administration degree and learn information that would help me run my residential painting business. I fell in love with sociology and decided that I wanted to get my bachelor’s, master’s, and PhD in sociology so that I could teach these ideas to college students. I especially appreciate the critical thinking skills that sociology can help to foster. My main areas of interest in sociology include marxian, feminist, and critical theory. I am particularly interested in critiques of capitalism and any forms of exploitation that occur along the lines of race, class, gender, status, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. I am also a member of Sociologists without Borders, an international sociological association that is dedicated to furthering human rights and social justice around the world.

I earned my bachelor’s degree from Longwood University and my master’s degree from North Carolina State University, and I am currently a PhD student at NCSU. I have been a non-traditional student throughout my academic career, so I understand and empathize with the unique circumstances that non-traditional students face while trying to earn a college degree.

While I enjoy doing statistical analyses, most of my research has been participant observation and theoretical in nature. My master’s thesis is titled “Construction Worker’s Reactions to Structural Alienation and Inequality.” I gathered my data for this project by working beside workers on expensive and extravagant houses. I wanted to find out what these workers think about the vast differentials of income, wealth, status, and power that exist in this society. I found that most workers usually don’t give this issue much thought and often focus their attention on areas of their lives that they feel they do have control over such as their interactions with their families and friends as well as their hobbies and religious activities.

I began doing construction work early in my life, as my father is a painting contractor, and I spent many summers working on construction sites while I was in high school. Construction has financed much of my college education, and I still enjoy getting out and climbing ladders and swinging a paint brush — every once in a while, that is. I’m still doing some construction work in order to gather more data for my dissertation, which is a participant observation study that focuses on the structure of the work process itself on these often unique houses. I compare Marx’s structural critique of capitalism with the conditions that exist on the jobsite of these nice houses. So far, I have found that the workers on these jobs experience quite a bit more control over the work process itself than do workers in jobs similar to those described by Marx and other marxists. Both Marx’s discussion of alienation and his critique of capitalism focused on manufacturing jobs which usually include much routinized labor where the workers are told exactly how to carry out even the most basic tasks of their jobs. Many of the workers I study have much more control over how they do their work because they are confronted with projects that are unique and cannot be completed by a set way of doing things. Many of these workers are content with their jobs because they believe that they are lucky to have their particular job, and because they believe that many of the jobs available in the society are much less desirable.

I have taught lecture courses at NCSU (including Principles of Sociology, Social Problems, and Theories of Social Structure). I have been teaching the on-line Methods in Sociological Research course for Mary Baldwin University since the fall of 2005. This is my second year as an academic advisor for the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs, and I work out of the Weyer’s Cave office at Blue Ridge Community College. (Stop by and see me some time if you want to talk about the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs or if you want to talk about sociology. You can also email me at rrobinso@marybaldwin.edu.)

In what little spare time I have from my studies and work, I enjoy hiking and bass fishing. Sherry, my wife of 22 years, and I both enjoy gardening and raising animals. We currently obediently serve numerous goldfish, koi, and betas, 6 cats (8 if you count the two strays that we feed as well), 2 goats, 2 dogs, and a horse on our farm in Nelson County.

540-887-7103

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Peter Ruiz-Haas

Associate Professor of Chemistry

Peter Ruiz-Haas

BA, Hampshire College; PhD, Oregon State University

Dr. Ruiz-Haas’ research interests are focused around the areas of analytical and environmental chemistry, with a focus on the chemical analysis of environmental samples, with an emphasis on analysis of hormones and endocrine disrupting compounds in the Shenandoah River, which is the main tributary to the Potomac River. Dr. Ruiz-Haas was recently awarded a grant from NIH to fund this research for the next two years

In addition, his research is centered interested in the development of analytical techniques and devices for low cost and/or field testing, as well as monitoring of redox transformations of organic pollutants in the environment by microorganisms. His students are also using UV light and ozone to destroy or remove traces of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in drinking and waste waters.

540-887-7194

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Martha Saunders

Assistant Professor of Art

Martha Saunders

BFA, Virginia Commonwealth University; MFA, Mount Royal School of Painting, Maryland Institute, College of Art

www.martha-saunders.com

For over 30 years Martha Saunders has been exhibiting her work throughout the east coast, including solo shows at the University of South Carolina, Hood College of Maryland, Virginia Commonwealth Medical Center of Virginia, and Piedmont Virginia Community College. In 2000 she was awarded a grant from the Southeastern College Art Conference, and her art is held in a number of corporate collections, such as those of Capital One Corporation, UVA Emily Couric Cancer Center, and VCU Medical Center, Richmond. Saunders received a MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, and a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and is represented by Les Yeux du Monde (Charlottesville, VA).

Saunders’ current work consists of painted panels using beeswax, pigment and collaged matter. Built up layers of material move from opaque to translucent, from seductive surface which speak to shifts between states of matter.

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Melissa Scheiber

Assistant Professor of Biology

Melissa Scheiber

AS, BS, Indiana University Northwest; PhD, Medical University of South Carolina

540-887-7390

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Jim R. Sconyers, Jr.

Associate Professor of Art

Jim R. Sconyers, Jr.

BA, University of North Carolina at Asheville; MFA, Indiana University, Bloomington

Jim Sconyers, Jr. is an artist in a variety of media, including printmaking, photography, digital media and sculpture.  In 2002, he received his MFA in Printmaking with Distinction from Indiana University’s Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts. Since that time, his work has been selected for both national and international exhibition. Recent bodies of work include transition memory, contingency, imago corporis impressa, and May in the Secret Garden. Recently Jim’s work was selected for inclusion in juried exhibitions at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art in Virginia Beach (New Waves 2017) and the Taubman Museum of Art in Roanoke, VA (Homeward Bound).

In July 2017, Jim’s work titled 3H2O was selected by the juror Francis Thompson to receive First Place Award in the national Juried Exhibit, “Celebrate Color & Light,” at the Fredericksburg Center for the Creative Arts. A solo exhibition of the artist’s most recent body of work, May in the Secret Garden, is currently on exhibit through September, 13, 2017, at the Ox-Eye Vineyard Tasting Room in Staunton, Virginia. A second solo exhibitions of Jim’s most recent work is scheduled for fall of 2017 at Bridgewater College, in Bridgewater, Virginia.

540-887-7268

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Edward A. Scott

Associate Professor of Philosophy

Edward A. Scott

BA, Slippery Rock State College; MA, PhD, Duquesne University

Edward A. Scott was born in Pittsburgh, Pa December 16, 1949. He received his BA in philosophy from Slippery Rock State University in 1971. He completed work for his MA and PhD at Duquesne University in 1973 and 1986 respectively. He took his first teaching job in philosophy in 1977 at an urban satellite for the Community College of Allegheny County. He has taught at the University of Calabar in Nigeria (79-81), Carlow College in Pittsburgh (81-82), Payne Theological Seminary in Wilberforce, Ohio (82-86) and Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois (86-90). He has been associate professor of philosophy at Mary Baldwin University in Staunton, VA since 1990. He has served both James Madison University (philosophy) and Virginia Tech (Black studies) as an adjunct professor. Most recently he has served as chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies and Assistant Dean of the College. He was appointed the Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College by President Fox prior to the beginning of the 2006 – 2007 academic year.

Scott’s primary interests are the history of philosophy, hermeneutics, phenomenology, aesthetics, and African American thought. His dissertation was a study of the intellectual career of Paul Ricoeur: On the way to Ontology: The Philosophy of Language in the Hermeneutic Phenomenology of Paul Ricoeur.

In addition to his academic involvements, Scott is a member of the Staunton City School Board, a member of the Board of Advisors for the local branch of the Salvation Army, and a member of the Board of Trustees for the American Shakespeare Center. He is also devoted to the ordained ministry of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, currently pastoring Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church in Staunton, VA.

In his writing and public presentations and addresses, Scott pursues a richer understanding of the intersection between sacred and profane realities as this is made evident in literature, music, politics, and religious experience. His abiding conviction is that the blues and jazz constitute daring exemplars for the manifestation of this intersection.

Scott is husband to Rev. Andrea Cornett-Scott and father to Jacob, Naima and Ellington Scott.

540-887-7247

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Daniel M. Stuhlsatz

Professor of Sociology

Daniel M. Stuhlsatz

BA, Wichita State University; MA, University of Wyoming; PhD, University of Virginia

Professor Daniel Stuhlsatz has been a faculty member at Mary Baldwin University since 1999. He received his bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Wichita State University, his master’s degree in sociology (University of Wyoming) and PhD in sociology (University of Virginia). He has worked as a sociologist at both the University of Virginia and at Mary Baldwin University.

“Dr. Dan” teaches courses in social inequality, social movements, environmental sociology and the sociology of religion. His goal is to share his passion for social and cultural diversity. His courses focus on this diversity both within the United States and around the world. Students are usually given the opportunity to investigate social issues in which they may be interested. Dr. Dan also supports a program of educational research with students. Students work with Professor Stuhlsatz for one or more semesters on some aspect of his ongoing research in the sociology of education. One major focus of this work is the relationship between financial resources and educational achievement. Another is the investigation of status relations among young children. Finally, Dr. Dan periodically teaches “study abroad” courses which include international travel.

Dr. Stuhlsatz was born and raised in “the West” (Kansas and Wyoming), and in his spare time enjoys hiking, mountaineering, bicycling, swimming, birds, flowers, and “nature”. He also enjoys the education that he himself receives on a daily basis from his family, including especially from his son.

540-887-7046

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Amy Tillerson

Professor of History

Amy Tillerson

BA, MA, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; PhD, Morgan State University

atillers@marybaldwin.edu

Amy Tillerson is a native of Prince Edward County. For her dissertation, Tillerson-Brown researched the activism of Black women in Prince Edward County, Virginia between 1930 and 1965. Prince Edward County is most well known for the school crisis that closed public schools for five years. Before accepting her position at Mary Baldwin University, she was director of African American Heritage Program at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities at UVA. She has taught in the history departments at University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, Morgan State, and Piedmont Virginia Community College. She has also been a public school teacher and counselor in Roanoke City Public Schools and Baltimore City Public Schools. She is the advisor to Phi Alpha Theta, the history honor society.

540-887-7059

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Katherine Turner

Professor of English

Katherine Turner

BA, University of Oxford (Balliol College); MPhil, PhD, University of Oxford

Dr. Katherine Turner, professor of English, teaches courses in British Literature and women’s writing, and the English Major Seminar. She previously taught at the University of Oxford in England, where she worked within the university as well for a number of American JYA programs (Butler, NCSU, Sarah Lawrence, Williams).

Dr. Turner holds several degrees (BA, MPhil and PhD) from the University of Oxford. Her main areas of academic interest are the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and she has worked particularly on travel writing, women’s writing, and eighteenth-century poetry. She is interested in the ways in which literary texts intersect with other cultural forms (like the visual arts and journalism) so as to intervene in issues of public controversy such as poverty, women’s education, marriage and divorce, and the slave trade.

Dr. Turner has edited Laurence Sterne’s eighteenth-century novel, A Sentimental Journey, for Broadview Press (a press dedicated to providing annotated texts for university students and scholars). Her essay on “Women Travel Writers, 1750-1830″ has appeared in  The History of British Women Writers, 1750-1830, edited by Jacqueline Labbe for Palgrave Macmillan. She has written the entry on “Travel Narrative” for the  Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of British Literature 1660-1789 and the entry on Thomas Gray for Oxford Handbooks Online, and is currently working on William Cowper and news.

540-887-7064

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Carey L. Usher

Associate Provost; Associate Professor of Sociology

Carey L. Usher

BA, Converse College; MA, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Originally from South Carolina, Carey Usher came to Mary Baldwin in 2001 after completing her graduate work at University of Alabama at Birmingham. Her dissertation research examined effects of neighborhood context and social capital on physical and mental health. Current research extends this study, focusing on social capital and community investment in high poverty areas. Her research and teaching interests include medical sociology, community and urban sociology, and research methodology. She is a strong supporter of single-gender education, having completed her undergraduate degree at Converse College. Her community service includes work with Habitat for Humanity, the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank, the Staunton City Council as a member of the Landscape Advisory Board, and the Virginia Cooperative Extension as a Master Gardener. Her service to these organizations involves building resident investment in and appreciation of community environment and greenspace. Drs. Usher and Stuhlsatz are currently serving as Co-Principal Investigators on a gang-assessment initiative with the Office on Youth.

In her spare time, Dr. Usher likes to read, drink coffee, garden, knit, and spend time with her family and pets. She lives in Staunton with her husband Bryan, their 4 boys, and too many animals.

540-887-7350

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Laura A. van Assendelft

Professor of Political Science

Laura A. van Assendelft

BA, University of the South; PhD, Emory University

Professor of political science Laura van Assendelft has been teaching at Mary Baldwin University since 1994. Currently serving as chair of the political science department, van Assendelft teaches American Government, State and Local Politics, U.S. Congress, U.S. Presidency, Women and Politics, Political Parties and Interest Groups, Political Behavior, and Senior Seminar in American Politics. Her research interests include state and local politics and women and politics. She has published numerous journal articles and several books, including Governors, Agenda Setting, and Divided GovernmentThe Encyclopedia of Women in American Politics (co-edited with Jeffrey Shultz), and two editions ofWomen, Politics, and American Society (co-authored with Nancy McGlen, Karen O’Connor, and Wendy Gunther-Canada). She received her BA in political science (cum laude with honors in political science) from The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee (1989) and her PhD in political science from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (1994). She was recognized by Who’s Who Among American Teachers in 2004, 2005, and 2006. Outside of teaching and research, her interests include spending time with family, running, hiking, horseback riding, reading, and photography.

540-887-7283

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Abigail "Abby" Wightman

Associate Professor of Anthropology; Spencer Center Faculty-in-Residence

Abigail "Abby" Wightman

BA, Miami University; MA, PhD, University of Oklahoma

A visiting assistant professor of anthropology, Wightman received a BA in history and anthropology from Miami University of Ohio, an MA in anthropology from University of Oklahoma, and a PhD in anthropology from University of Oklahoma. After completing her doctorate in May 2009, Wightman joined the faculty at Mary Baldwin University for fall semester. Her dissertation, “Honoring Kin: Gender, Kinship, and the Economy of Plains Apache Identity,” addresses the complicated articulations and lived experiences of contemporary Native-American identities. Wightman’s research interests also include the culture and history of Oklahoma, regional American identities, the relationship between gender ideologies and cultural/national identities, the history of anthropology, and the lived experiences of marginalization in native communities and beyond.

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