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Shakespeare and Performance
Faculty

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Paul Menzer

Program Director; Professor of Shakespeare and Performance

Paul Menzer

Paul Menzer is a professor and the director of the Mary Baldwin University MLitt/MFA Shakespeare and Performance graduate program. He is the editor of Inside Shakespeare: Essays on the Blackfriars Stage (2006), author of The Hamlets: Cues, Q’s, and Remembered Texts (2008), Anecdotal Shakespeare: a New Performance History (2015), and of dozens of articles, essays, reviews, and chapters on theatre history, textual criticism, and performance studies. He is President of the Marlowe Society of America and co-editor of The Hare, an online journal of brief essays and untimely reviews. He is also a practicing playwright and his plays AnonymousThe Brats of Clarence, and Shakespeare on Ice have appeared on the Blackfriars stage and elsewhere. His most recent play, Invisible Inc., premiered at the Long Center for the Performing Arts in Austin, Texas in early 2013. He has a book forthcoming in 2016 entitled Making History: The American Shakespeare Center and Permanent Revolution.

Featured publications

  • Anecdotal Shakespeare: a New Performance History, The Arden Shakespeare, 2015.
  • The Hamlets: Cues, Qs, and the remembered text, University of Delaware Press: 2008. Times Literary Supplement, “Book of the Year,” 2010
  • Editor, Inside Shakespeare: Essays on the Blackfriars Stage, Susquehanna University Press: 2006.
  • “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” in Moving Shakespeare Indoors, eds. Farah Karim-Cooper and Andrew Gurr (Cambridge University Press, 2013)
  • “Lines,” in 21st Century Approaches: Early Modern Theatricality, ed. Henry S. Turner (Oxford University Press, 2013)
  • “Marlowe’s End” in Marlowe in Context,eds. Emma Smith and Emily Bartels (Cambridge University Press, 2013)
  • “Character Acting,” in Special Effects on the Early Modern Stage, eds. Tiffany Stern and Farah Karim-Cooper (Arden, 2013)
  • cf. Marlowe,” in Richard II: New Critical Essays, ed. Jeremy Lopez (Routledge, 2012)
  • “Ophelia’s Wake” in The Afterlife of Ophelia, eds. Deanne Williams and Kaara Petersen (Palgrave, 2012)
  • “Crowd Control,” in Imagining the Audience in Early Modern Drama, 1558-1642, eds. Jennifer Low and Nova Myhill (Palgrave, 2011)
  • “Fractional Faustus” in Christopher Marlowe the Craftsman: Lives, Stage, and Page, eds. Sarah Scott and Michael Stapleton (Ashgate, 2010)
  • “The Spirit of ’76: Original Practices and Revolutionary Nostalgia” in New Directions for Renaissance Drama and Performance Studies, ed. Sarah Werner (Palgrave, 2010).
  • “The Weaver’s Dream: mnemonic scripts and memorial texts,” A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Critical Guide,ed. Regina Buccola (Continuum Press, 2010)
  • “‘The Tragedians of the City’? Q1 Hamlet and the settlements of the 1590s,” Shakespeare Quarterly, 57 (2006): 162-82.
  • “The Actor’s Inhibition: early modern acting and the rhetoric of restraint,” Renaissance Drama, 35 (2006): 83-112.

540-887-7261

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Doreen Bechtol

Assistant Professor of Shakespeare and Performance

Doreen Bechtol

Doreen Bechtol is the Master of Fine Arts Company Manager and Director of Training for the Shakespeare and Performance program at Mary Baldwin University. As a physical trainer, her approach blends several modes of training, such as: Suzuki and Viewpoints, acrobatics, dance, yoga, and basic calisthenics. As the director of the MFA Company’s devised show, she developed her brand of ensemble-based work for creating original performance through years of training with the SITI Company and with Joseph Chaikin, the founder of the Open Theater. She has directed and performed in over fifteen original devised performances, and she also wrote, directed, and edited a silent film based on The Winter’s Tale called For This Time We Pardon. She is a co-founding member of the Performers Exchange Project, a company dedicated to the creation of new and original work. She worked at the American Shakespeare Center (ASC) for over ten years both as a performer and choreographer in the Resident Troupe at the Blackfriars Playhouse, and as the Director of Youth Programs and College Prep, where she ran an internationally recognized Shakespeare theatre camp for teens. While at the ASC she also developed educational outreach programs, and led workshops examining the dynamic use of architecture in Shakespeare’s plays on the early modern stage. She remains the only actor at the ASC ever to have used the fly system when she entered from what is known as “the heavens” on a circus hoop as Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. She received her MFA from Mary Baldwin University’s Shakespeare and Performance program, and her BFA in Theatre and Education at Western Michigan University.

540-887-7251

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Ralph Alan Cohen

Professor of Shakespeare and Performance and English; Virginia Worth Gonder Fellow in Theatre

Ralph Alan Cohen

Ralph Alan Cohen is Co-Founder and Director of Mission at the American Shakespeare Center and Gonder Professor of Shakespeare and Performance and founder of the Master of Letters and Fine Arts program at Mary Baldwin University. He was project director for the building of the Blackfriars Playhouse — a recreation of Shakespeare’s indoor theatre — in Staunton Virginia. He has directed 30 productions of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including America’s first professional production of Francis Beaumont’s The Knight of the Burning Pestle. He also directed the first revival of Thomas Middleton’s Your Five Gallants and co-edited the play for Oxford University Press’s Collected Works of Thomas Middleton. He is the author of ShakesFear and How to Cure It: A Handbook for Teaching Shakespeare. He twice edited special teaching issues of the Shakespeare Quarterly and has published articles on teaching Shakespeare as well as on Shakespeare, Jonson, and Elizabethan staging. He founded the Studies Abroad program at James Madison University, where he won Virginia’s award for outstanding faculty. He has frequently directed summer institutes on Shakespeare and staging sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 2001 he established the Blackfriars Conference, a bi-annual week-long celebration of early modern drama in performance. In 2008, Cohen and ASC co-founder Jim Warren earned the Commonwealth Governor’s Arts Award. In 2009 he was the Theo Crosby Fellow at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. He earned his undergraduate degree at Dartmouth College and his doctorate at Duke University and has honorary degrees from St. Lawrence University and Georgetown University.

540-887-7248

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Matthew Davies

Associate Professor of Shakespeare and Performance

Matthew Davies

Matt Davies is an Assistant Professor in the MLitt/MFA Shakespeare and Performance program at Mary Baldwin and a professional actor and director of twenty years standing in the UK and the US. An associate director of renowned Shakespeare company Actors From The London Stage, Matt has been touring the States since 1999. He began his graduate studies at UT Austin in 2004 and defended his Ph.D dissertation in the summer of 2012. Earning three fellowships and a graduate teaching award while at UT, Matt also continued working professionally in the city’s vibrant theater community. Alongside UK national acting awards for two new works, Our Boys and Misconceptions, Matt has received numerous B. Iden Payne and Critics Circle awards and nominations for his classical work for Texas theater companies Austin Shakespeare, Hidden Room, and the Chekhov-based Breaking String, of which he is a founding member. Matt has directed both the classics and new works in London, Glasgow, Houston, and Austin.

540-887-7031

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Kerry Cooke

Assistant Professor of Theatre and Shakespeare and Performance

Kerry Cooke

BA, MA, University of Nevada, Reno; MA, PhD, The Shakespeare Institute, The University of Birmingham UK
Dr. Kerry Cooke is a scholar of early modern studies, a bibliographer, and a pedagogue. Her research investigates the intersection between drama, prose, letter writing, and authorship in early modern England. She has published in notable journals, including the article “Addressing the Addressee” in Journal for Early Modern Studies, which examines the function of epistolary theory in Shakespeare’s comedies. She is currently working on her monograph Epistolary Authorship in Early Modern England – a study that uses a bibliographical analysis of letter-writing manuals and prose fiction to re-evaluate their interrelated development – which will be published in Palgrave’s series “Material Readings in Early Modern Culture” in 2017.

As this study indicates, bibliographical analysis informs her literary criticism, though it also contributes to the field of print culture and book history: she recently published a bibliographical analysis of incunabula and early sixteenth-century texts titled “Signature Style” in the international journal De Gulden Passer. In addition, she has contributed book reviews to journals such asCultural History and Cahiers Élisabéthans. 

Her pedagogical profile lists a broad range of teaching experience: she taught courses on pre-1800 literature and critical theory at the University of Birmingham (UK), as well as Shakespeare at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust (UK), and at Mary Baldwin College. In addition she has taught theatre history and performance analysis at James Madison University. She has given guest lectures at various universities and education centers, such as The American Shakespeare Center. She will give a plenary paper on “documents of death” at the “Cultures of Mortality” conference at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. She holds an
M.A. in Shakespeare Studies and a Ph.D. in English from The Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, administered by the University of Birmingham.

540-887-7193

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Lise Keiter

Professor of Music

Lise Keiter

Oberlin College and Conservatory of Music; MM, DM, Indiana University

Pianist Lise Keiter has performed throughout the U.S. and in Europe, and she is very active as a solo recitalist, collaborative artist, and soloist with orchestra.   Her European appearances include recitals with France’s International Roussel Festival, as well as with the Internationale Academie de Musique in Gargenville, France.  She has recently appeared as a concerto soloist with orchestras in Indiana, Virginia, and North Carolina, and her latest solo and chamber music performance engagements have taken her to New York City, North Carolina, Maryland, Wisconsin, Idaho, West Virginia, Illinois, South Carolina, and throughout Virginia, including recent performances with the Heifetz Institute and with the Shenandoah Valley Bach Festival.

Dr. Keiter is on the faculty at Mary Baldwin University, where she currently serves as Music Department Chair.  Her work at Mary Baldwin led her to develop an interest in the music of women composers, and in 2005, she developed an all-women composers program of solo piano works, in honor of the bicentenary year of pianist and composer Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (1805-1847). In February 2014, she was the featured soloist with the Waynesboro Symphony, performing Florence B. Price’s Concerto in One Movement.  

Frequently in demand as a lecturer, adjudicator, and masterclass clinician, Dr. Keiter is active in many organizations, including MTNA (Music Teachers National Association) and CMS (College Music Society). She is committed to furthering the education of young musicians and also maintains a studio of high school students.  Her students include numerous competition winners, and many have been accepted into prestigious music programs at colleges, conservatories, and graduate programs across the U.S. and in Europe. Originally from Charleston, Illinois, she has a Bachelor of Music degree from the Oberlin Conservatory, where she received several top prizes, and she completed a Master’s Degree and the Doctorate of Music at Indiana University, where she also received the Award for Outstanding Teaching.   Her teachers have included Leonard Hokanson, Gyorgy Sebok, Robert McDonald, Emile Nauomoff, and Evelyn Brancart.

540-887-7375

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James Allan Moyé

Adjunct Faculty Member; Director of Communication Studios

James Allan Moyé

BA, East Carolina University; MFA, University of New Orleans

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Film, Director of Film Minor, and Director of Studios Allan Moyé has taught communication courses at Mary Baldwin University for nine years, including video production classes, film studies, screenwriting, and broadcasting. He received his undergraduate degree from East Carolina University. He studied screenwriting at Georgetown University and UCLA, filmmaking at the New York Film Academy, and has had extensive training in audio production. He earned his MFA in Drama/Communications from the University of New Orleans, in which program he studied under filmmaker Miroslav Mandic in Prague, Czech Republic.

Moyé also teaches screenwriting for the University of New Orleans’ Low Residency MFA program and has been an instructor at UNO’s Summer Seminars in Madrid, Spain.

He is a two-time recipient of the Governor’s Award for Screenwriting at the Virginia Festival of American Film and has won awards from America’s Best Screenplay competition and the Wisconsin Screenwriter’s Forum. Two of his narrative screenplays, “The Blue Man” and “The Good Neighbor” have been optioned in Hollywood. Moyé has produced and directed various short films and been a contributor to many narrative and documentary projects. He is front man and songwriter for the rock ‘n roll band, The Findells.

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John Paul "JP" Scheidler

Assistant Professor of Theatre and Shakespeare and Performance

John Paul "JP" Scheidler

John Paul Scheidler teaches movement and stage combat classes in both the MLitt and MFA programs. John Paul is a professional actor, fight choreographer and director with membership in Actor’s Equity Assoc. and is a certified teacher with the Society of American Fight Directors. He has worked professionally with Heritage Rep. Theatre, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, The Blackfrairs Playhouse, NYC Opera and was a company member with Wellspring/Cori Terry and Dancers for 3 years. Education includes an MFA from the University of Virginia, Hap Ki Do, and a BA in Drama and Dance from Western Michigan University.

540-887-7192

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Theresa K. "Terry" Southerington

Professor of Theatre; Margaret Hunt Hill Distinguished Chair in Humanities

Theresa K. "Terry" Southerington

Professor of Theatre and holder of the Margaret Hunt Hill Chair in Humanities; BA, Mary Baldwin College; MS, Madison College; MA, MFA, University of Virginia

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