How About a Little Music on the Side?

January 29, 2004

“How can you live without doing what you’re passionate about?”

Allan & SeraSo says Allan Moy&eacute, who, along with fellow faculty members such as Ed Petkus, Jim Harrington, and Carole Grove, plays music not as a profession but as a hobby. They appear around town and elsewhere.

Allan, assistant professor of communication and director of studios, plays guitar in the local rock and roll band The Findells. He has written the songs on his band’s three CDs. Music, he says, is both a creative outlet and an escape. “The music takes you to a new place,” says Allan. “Many people my age have put this behind them, but I can’t see myself being content without it. I love the energy, the release, the passion.”

The Findells, who play at clubs and restaurants in and around Staunton, are influenced by the New York underground music movement of the ’60s and ’70s. The Findells “don’t compromise,” says Alan. “I want to be soaked in sweat by the end of the evening.”

Ed PetkusEd, associate professor of business administration, recently performed acoustic-guitar interpretations of New Wave music from the Eighties during lunchtime at the Staunton Public Library. Of performing, he says that he particularly enjoys “that nervous-proud feeling of having risen to a unique challenge and not completely blown it.” For Ed, music is a way of fulfilling what he calls the “basic human need” for creative expression. He taught himself guitar in high school when, he says, “I wanted to be Neil Young.”

Jim, Baldwin Online and Adult Programs professor of education, sees music and teaching as well suited for each other. “There’s this intense, risky moment in performing that is transferable to teaching,” he says. Jim is versatile. He has played the piano in the group Wanda and the White Boys and plays the accordion for tracks on various CDs and at festivals.

“It’s exciting to play music that people respond to and remember,” says Jim. “It’s a very powerful thing.” He enjoys playing Celtic music. In October, he played German accordion music at the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton. “It’s an amazing feeling,” says Jim of performing. “Music is a language.”

“I’ve been coerced into playing the harp at three weddings,” says Carole. Director of the Master of Arts in Teaching Program and professor of education, she considers herself a “happy amateur” and says that playing the classical pedal harp and piano is “great relaxation and therapy.” Carole has played at several national conference receptions and “absolutely loves” the challenge of performing. “It gets a little better all the time,” she says. himself guitar in high school when, he says, “I wanted to be Neil Young.”

Jim HarringtonJim, Baldwin Online and Adult Programs professor of education, sees music and teaching as well suited for each other. “There’s this intense, risky moment in performing that is transferable to teaching,” he says. Jim is versatile. He has played the piano in the group Wanda and the White Boys and plays the accordion for tracks on various CDs and at festivals.

“It’s exciting to play music that people respond to and remember,” says Jim. “It’s a very powerful thing.” He enjoys playing Celtic music. In October, he played German accordion music at the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton. “It’s an amazing feeling,” says Jim of performing. “Music is a language.”

“I’ve been coerced into playing the harp at three weddings,” says Carole. Director of the Master of Arts in Teaching Program and professor of education, she considers herself a “happy amateur” and says that playing the classical pedal harp and piano is “great relaxation and therapy.” Carole has played at several national conference receptions and “absolutely loves” the challenge of performing. “It gets a little better all the time,” she says.